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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2019 Apr;26(12):11975-11987. doi: 10.1007/s11356-019-04510-w. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Metal composition of arrow squid (Nototodarus sloanii [Gray 1849]) from the Chatham Rise, New Zealand: implications for human consumption.

Author information

1
AUT School of Science New Zealand, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland, 1142, New Zealand. alexandralischka90@gmail.com.
2
AUT School of Science New Zealand, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland, 1142, New Zealand.

Abstract

Cephalopods are important in the diets of humans and many other apex predators, and can play an important role in the bioaccumulation of metals. In this study, metal concentrations were analysed in the commercially and ecologically important southern arrow squid, Nototodarus sloanii (Gray 1849), from a heavily targeted fisheries area on New Zealand's Chatham Rise. A variety of tissue types were compared in order to assess the bioaccumulation in edible tissues (mantle and arms) and other organs (digestive gland, kidney, and hearts). Although metal concentrations varied among tissue types, the highest concentrations were found in the digestive gland (for Cd, Cu, Fe, Ni, Zn) and branchial hearts (for Cr, U). We report the first Cd concentrations for N. sloanii from the Chatham Rise, with mean values of 3.11 μg. g-1 in the mantle and 102.53 μg. g-1 in the digestive gland. Our data suggest that concentrations observed in the mantle tissue (which forms the majority of the muscle tissue) and digestive gland (the primary organ for metal accumulation) can be used to estimate the animal's total body burden for all metals analysed. The toxicological and dietary consequences for predators (including humans) feeding on arrow squid can be inferred from measurements of mass and metal concentration in these tissues. Arrow squid represent an important vector for Cd transfer within the pelagic Chatham Rise food web. These are the first recorded baseline data for metal concentrations for any squid in this oceanic region.

KEYWORDS:

Biomonitoring; Cephalopod; Commercial fisheries; Human consumption; Marine metals; Metal body burden; Metal physiology; Ommastrephidae

PMID:
30825127
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-019-04510-w

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