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Nanomaterials (Basel). 2019 Jan 11;9(1). pii: E90. doi: 10.3390/nano9010090.

Laser-Induced Graphene on Additive Manufacturing Parts.

Author information

1
Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, School of Mechanical and Aerospace, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore. jiao0011@e.ntu.edu.sg.
2
Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, School of Mechanical and Aerospace, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore. chua0735@e.ntu.edu.sg.
3
Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, School of Mechanical and Aerospace, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798, Singapore. skmoon@ntu.edu.sg.
4
Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 73 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637662, Singapore. so0001ie@gmail.com.
5
Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, 73 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637662, Singapore. gjbi@simtech.a-star.edu.sg.
6
School of Mechanical Engineering, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255000, China. zhenghongyu@sdut.edu.cn.
7
Global Technology Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Suwon 16677, Korea. bh13.lee@samsung.com.
8
Global Technology Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Suwon 16677, Korea. jamyeong.koo@samsung.com.

Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) has become more prominent in leading industries. Recently, there have been intense efforts to achieve a fully functional 3D structural electronic device by integrating conductive structures into AM parts. Here, we introduce a simple approach to creating a conductive layer on a polymer AM part by CO₂ laser processing. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy were employed to analyze laser-induced modifications in surface morphology and surface chemistry. The results suggest that conductive porous graphene was obtained from the AM-produced carbon precursor after the CO₂ laser scanning. At a laser power of 4.5 W, the lowest sheet resistance of 15.9 Ω/sq was obtained, indicating the excellent electrical conductivity of the laser-induced graphene (LIG). The conductive graphene on the AM parts could serve as an electrical interconnection and shows a potential for the manufacturing of electronics components. An interdigital electrode capacitor was written on the AM parts to demonstrate the capability of LIG. Cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and cyclability testing demonstrated good electrochemical performance of the LIG capacitor. These findings may create opportunities for the integration of laser direct writing electronic and additive manufacturing.

KEYWORDS:

3D printing; additive manufacturing; laser direct writing electronics; laser-induced graphene

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