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Nutrients. 2019 Feb 18;11(2). pii: E427. doi: 10.3390/nu11020427.

New Insights on the Nutrition Status and Antioxidant Capacity in Multiple Sclerosis Patients.

Author information

1
Research Laboratory, Ziv Medical Center, Zefat 1311001, Israel. ayelet.o@ziv.health.gov.il.
2
Research Laboratory, Ziv Medical Center, Zefat 1311001, Israel. chen.w@ziv.health.gov.il.
3
Department of Neurology, Ziv Medical Center, Zefat 1311001, Israel. naaem.s@ziv.health.gov.il.
4
Faculty of Medicine, Bar Ilan University, Zefat 1311502, Israel. naaem.s@ziv.health.gov.il.
5
Research Laboratory, Ziv Medical Center, Zefat 1311001, Israel. hadar.n@ziv.health.gov.il.
6
Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Zefat Academic College, Zefat 1320611, Israel. hadar.n@ziv.health.gov.il.
7
Laboratory of Human Health and Nutrition Sciences, MIGAL-Galilee Research Institute, Kiryat Shmona 11016, Israel. snait@telhai.ac.il.
8
Nutritional Sciences, Tel-Hai College, Upper Galilee 12208, Israel. snait@telhai.ac.il.
9
Department of Neurology, Ziv Medical Center, Zefat 1311001, Israel. shahien.r@ziv.health.gov.il.
10
Faculty of Medicine, Bar Ilan University, Zefat 1311502, Israel. shahien.r@ziv.health.gov.il.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifactorial disease with unknown etiology. It is assumed to result from interplay between genetic and environmental factors, including nutrition. We hypothesized that there are differences in nutritional parameters between MS patients and healthy controls.

METHODS:

We examined 63 MS patients and 83 healthy controls. Nutritional status was determined by a dietary questionnaire, blood tests, quantification of cell membrane fatty acids, and serum antioxidant capacity.

RESULTS:

We found that MS patients consumed a more limited diet compared with the healthy group, indicated by a lower average of 31 nutrients and by consumption levels of zinc and thiamine below the recommended daily intake. Both consumption and measured iron values were significantly lower in MS patients, with the lowest measures in the severe MS group. Long saturated fatty acids (>C16) were significantly lower in MS patients, while palmitic and palmitoleic acids were both higher. Serum total antioxidant capacity was significantly lower in the MS group compared with healthy controls, with the lowest measures in patients with severe MS.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study points to a possible correlation between nutritional status and MS. Understanding the clinical meaning of these findings will potentially allow for the development of future personalized dietary interventions as part of MS treatment.

KEYWORDS:

antioxidant capacity; fatty acids; multiple sclerosis; nutrients; nutrition

PMID:
30781687
PMCID:
PMC6413226
DOI:
10.3390/nu11020427
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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