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Cell Immunol. 1999 Feb 1;191(2):97-104.

IgG subclass switching is associated with the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide in NOD mice.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Department of Medicine (Neurology), Department of Pathology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, 390, Japan.

Abstract

We have recently shown that a single dose of the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) peptide 35-55 produces a relapsing-remitting demyelinating disease similar to multiple sclerosis (MS) in Lewis rats. In this study we have assessed the possibility that a subclass of anti-MOG35-55 antibodies influences the clinical outcome of these diseases by examining the classes and isotypes of anti-MOG35-55 antibody produced during the course of MOG35-55-induced demyelinating disease in NOD mice. Following immunization, 7 of the 21 injected mice had only mild diseases, while the 14 others had severe progressive and/or relapsing-remitting diseases. There were no differences in anti-MOG35-55 IgG, IgA, IgM, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG3 antibody titers between the severe and mild symptoms groups. High levels of IgG2b antibody to MOG35-55 were detected in all mice with severe symptoms. In contrast, none of the mice which contracted a mild disease produced anti-MOG35-55 IgG2b. These results suggest that in NOD mice, the IgG2b antibody response to MOG35-55 is associated with the severity of this MS-like demyelinating disease.

PMID:
9973531
DOI:
10.1006/cimm.1998.1414
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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