Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Bone. 1999 Feb;24(2):151-5.

Epidemiological study of hip fracture in Shenyang, People's Republic of China.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine, Shenyang Medical College, People's Republic of China. liya.yan@mrc-hnr.cam.ac.uk

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and epidemiology in 1994 of hip fracture in Shenyang, a large city in the northeast of The People's Republic of China, using register information and medical records collected from the 36 hospitals in Shenyang. The hip fracture data were restricted to cervical or trochanteric types. A subset (59% of total) of medical records of hip fracture was used to investigate the causes of hip fracture. The causes were classified as simple fall, fall from a bicycle during cycling, bicycle accident, car accident, and fall from a height. There was a total of 453 hip fractures (206 in women and 247 in men) in the population over 50 years of age. The age-adjusted 1 year cumulative incidence rate was 67/100,000 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 58-76/100,000) for women and 81/100,000 (95% CI = 71-91/100,000) for men. The standardized incidence rate against the 1985 U.S. population was 87/100,000 (95% CI = 77-97/100,000) for women and 100/100,000 (95% CI = 89-111/100,000) for men. The mean (+/-standard deviation) age of patients with a hip fracture was 67.5+/-9.8 years for men and 66.9+/-9.0 years for women. The overall male-to-female ratio of hip fracture was 1.21:1 for age-adjusted hip fracture incidence and 1.15:1 for standardized incidence. Simple fall accounted for 70% hip fractures in women but caused only 49% in men (chi2 = 11.2, degrees of freedom [df] = 1,p = 0.0008). The frequency of hip fractures caused by a fall from a bicycle was higher in men (28%) than women (10%) (chi2 = 13.0, df = 1,p = 0.0003). The results of this study indicate (1) a low incidence of hip fracture in a Chinese population compared with more affluent countries, and (b) a higher incidence in men than women that is related in part to a higher incidence of accidents, especially bicycle-related ones.

PMID:
9951786
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center