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Int J Cancer. 1999 Jan 29;80(3):396-9.

Attenuation by genistein of sodium-chloride-enhanced gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in Wistar rats.

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1
Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Japan.

Abstract

The effects of prolonged administration of genistein, a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, on sodium-chloride-enhanced induction of gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and the labeling and apoptotic indices and vessel counts in the gastric mucosa and gastric cancers, were investigated in Wistar rats. After 25 weeks of the carcinogen treatment, rats were fed chow pellets containing 10% sodium chloride and were given s.c. injections of genistein at dosages of 15 mg/kg or 30 mg/kg body weight every other day. In week 52, the incidence of gastric cancers was significantly greater in rats fed sodium chloride than in untreated control rats. Prolonged administration of genistein at a dosage of 30 mg/kg, but not 15 mg/kg, body weight significantly reduced the incidence of gastric cancers, which was increased by oral treatment with sodium chloride. Genistein at the higher dose significantly decreased the labeling index and vessel counts of the antral mucosa and the gastric cancers (which were increased by treatment with sodium chloride) and significantly increased the apoptotic index of the antral mucosa and the cancers (which was lowered by the treatment with sodium chloride). These findings suggest that genistein attenuates gastric carcinogenesis promoted by sodium chloride, by inducing increased apoptosis and lower cell proliferation and angiogenesis of antral mucosa and gastric cancers.

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