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Gastroenterology. 1999 Feb;116(2):239-47.

Rebound hypersecretion after omeprazole and its relation to on-treatment acid suppression and Helicobacter pylori status.

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1
University Department of Medicine & Therapeutics, Western Infirmary, Glasgow, Scotland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

There have been conflicting reports regarding acid secretion after treatment with omeprazole. This study examined acid secretion after treatment with omeprazole and its relation to Helicobacter pylori status and on-treatment gastric function.

METHODS:

Twelve H. pylori-negative and 9 H. pylori-positive subjects were examined before, on, and at day 15 after an 8-week course of 40 mg/day omeprazole. On each occasion, plasma gastrin, intragastric pH, and acid output were measured basally and in response to increasing doses of gastrin 17.

RESULTS:

In the H. pylori-negative subjects at day 15 after omeprazole treatment, basal acid output was 82% higher (P < 0.007) and maximal acid output 28% higher (P < 0.003) than before omeprazole. The degree of increase in maximal acid output was related to both on-treatment pH and on-treatment fasting gastrin levels, being 48.0% in subjects with an on-treatment pH of >4 vs. 21. 0% in those with a pH of <4 (P < 0.02) and 49.2% in subjects with an on-treatment gastrin of >25 ng. L-1 vs. 19.8% in those with a fasting gastrin of <25 ng. L-1 (P < 0.006). At day 15 after omeprazole treatment, the H. pylori-positive subjects showed a heterogeneous response with some having increased acid output and others persisting suppression.

CONCLUSIONS:

Rebound acid hypersecretion occurs in H. pylori-negative subjects after omeprazole treatment. Its severity is related to the degree of elevation of pH on treatment. Persisting suppression of acid secretion masks the phenomenon in H. pylori-positive subjects.

PMID:
9922302
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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