Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Proc Biol Sci. 1998 Dec 7;265(1412):2273-8.

On the origin of species by means of assortative mating.

Author information

1
Section of Ecology and Systematics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. ask3@cornell.edu

Abstract

Assortative mating may split a population even in the absence of natural selection. Here, we study when this happens if mating depends on one or two quantitative traits. Not surprisingly, the modes of assortative mating that can cause sympatric speciation without selection are rather strict. However, some of them may occur in nature. Slow elimination of intermediate individuals caused by the gradual tightening of assortative mating, which evolves owing to relatively weak disruptive selection, provides the alternative scenario for sympatric speciation, in addition to fast elimination of intermediate individuals as a result of the direct action of strong disruptive selection under an invariant mode of assortative mating. Even when assortative mating alone cannot split an initially coherent population, it may be able to prevent the merging of species after their secondary contact.

PMID:
9881472
PMCID:
PMC1689519
DOI:
10.1098/rspb.1998.0570
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center