Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Semin Liver Dis. 1998;18(4):415-24.

Glutathione therapy: from prodrugs to genes.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Cell Sciences, University of Memphis, Tennessee 38152, USA.

Abstract

Glutathione (GSH; L-gamma-glutamyl-L-cysteineglycine) is found in almost all mammalian cells, and liver has very high intracellular levels of GSH. It has many cellular functions, such as being a coenzyme, maintaining thiol/disulfide status, protection against toxic compounds and oxidative stress. GSH levels have been reported to be low in a number of pathological conditions; thus methods for increasing GSH levels are desirable. GSH may be increased by supplying its amino acid precursor cysteine, in the form of prodrugs, such as N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and 2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylate (OTC). It may also be increased by giving gamma-glutamylcysteine, a dipeptide precursor GSH monoester and GSH diester are effective GSH delivery drugs. Such compounds may be therapeutically useful. Gene therapy may be useful for longer term therapy of GSH deficiency.

PMID:
9875558
DOI:
10.1055/s-2007-1007174
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart, New York
Loading ...
Support Center