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Arch Dermatol. 1998 Dec;134(12):1543-9.

A systematic review of autologous transplantation methods in vitiligo.

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  • 1Netherlands Institute for Pigmentary Disorders, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. snip-ww@knoware.nl

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

A systematic review of the effectiveness, safety, and applicability of autologous transplantation methods in vitiligo.

DATA SOURCES:

Computerized searches of bibliographical databases, a complementary manual literature search, and contacts with researchers and pharmaceutical firms.

STUDY SELECTION:

Predefined selection criteria were applied to all studies found.

DATA EXTRACTION:

Two investigators independently assessed the articles for inclusion. When there was a disagreement, a third investigator was consulted.

DATA SYNTHESIS:

Sixty-three studies were found, of which 16 reported on minigrafting, 13 on split-thickness grafting, 15 on grafting of epidermal blisters, 17 on grafting of cultured melanocytes, and 2 on grafting of noncultured epidermal suspension. Of these, 39 patient series were included. The highest mean success rates (87%) were achieved with split-skin grafting (95% confidence interval, 82%-91%), and epidermal blister grafting (87%) (95% confidence interval, 83%-90%). The mean success rate of 5 culturing techniques varied from 13% to 53%. However, in 4 of the 5 culturing methods, fewer than 20 patients were studied. Minigrafting had the highest rates of adverse effects but was the easiest, fastest, and least expensive method.

CONCLUSIONS:

Because no controlled trials were included, treatment recommendations should be formulated with caution. Split-thickness and epidermal blister grafting can be recommended as the most effective and safest techniques. No definite conclusions can be drawn about the effectiveness of culturing techniques because only a small number of patients have been studied. The choice of method also depends on certain disease characteristics and the availability of specialized personnel and equipment.

PMID:
9875191
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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