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J Soc Psychol. 1998 Dec;138(6):690-709.

The importance of employee demographic profiles for understanding experiences of work-family interrole conflicts.

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1
Department of Management, College of Business, St. Cloud State University, USA. bwemgmt@stcloudstate.edu

Abstract

This article investigated the reported experiences of work-family interrole conflict differences between American men and women. Participants answered questions on several questionnaires and were classified according to marital status, working or non-working spouse or partner, and presence of children. Overall, men reported significantly higher levels of work-to-family and strain-based, family-to-work conflict. Married men with working spouses, with and without children, and married men with children and non-working spouses reported higher levels of time-based and strain-based, family-to-work conflict than women in each corresponding category. The highest time-based, family-to-work conflict was reported by divorced women with children.

PMID:
9872064
DOI:
10.1080/00224549809603255
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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