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Eur J Immunol. 1998 Dec;28(12):4094-104.

CTX, a Xenopus thymocyte receptor, defines a molecular family conserved throughout vertebrates.

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Basel Institute for Immunology, Switzerland.


CTX, a cortical thymocyte marker in Xenopus, is an immunoglobulin superfamily (Igsf) member comprising one variable and one constant C2-type Igsf domain, a transmembrane segment and a cytoplasmic tail. Although resembling that of the TCR and immunoglobulins, the variable domain is not encoded by somatic rearrangement of the gene but by splicing of two half-domain exons. The C2 domain, also encoded by two exons, has an extra pair of cysteines. The transmembrane segment is free of charged residues, and the cytoplasmic tail (70 amino acids) contains one tyrosine and many glutamic acid residues. ChT1, a chicken homologue of CTX, has the same structural and genetic features, and both molecules are expressed on the thymocyte surface. We cloned new mouse (CTM) and human (CTH) cDNA and genes which are highly homologous to CTX/ChT1 but not lymphocyte specific. Similarity with recently described human cell surface molecules, A33 antigen and CAR (coxsackie and adenovirus 5 receptor), and a number of expressed sequence tags leads us to propose that CTX defines a novel subset of the Igsf, conserved throughout vertebrates and extending beyond the immune system. Strong homologies within vertebrate sequences suggest that the V and C2 CTX domains are scions of a very ancient lineage.

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