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Am J Cardiol. 1998 Dec 1;82(11):1333-8.

Prognosis of "clandestine" myocardial ischemia, silent myocardial ischemia, and angina pectoris in medically treated patients.

Author information

1
Servei de Cardiologia, Hospital General Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. jcandell@hg.vhebron.es

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the prognosis of medically treated patients with "clandestine" myocardial ischemia (perfusion defect without angina and no ST depression > 1 mm during exercise test) compared to those with silent myocardial ischemia (ST-segment depression > 1 mm, without angina) and those with angina pectoris. One hundred twelve patients without previous myocardial infarction were included. All patients underwent a symptom-limited exercise test on a bicycle ergometer, myocardial perfusion technetium-99m-methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and coronary angiography. They were classified into 3 groups (angina group, 34 patients; silent group, 20 patients; and the clandestine group, 58 patients). The mean follow-up was 3.6 years (range 6 months to 5.5 years). Patients with clandestine ischemia had a lower scintigraphic and angiographic score than patients with silent ischemia (25+/-8 vs 31+/-9 and 24+/-8 vs 29+/-7, p = 0.008, respectively), but the prognosis was similar. Only angina and severe reversible SPECT defects were predictive for cardiac events: death + myocardial infarction + revascularization. We conclude that in medically treated patients without previous myocardial infarction, angina and severe reversible SPECT defects are predictive for cardiac events only when the need for revascularization is included as a cardiac event.

PMID:
9856915
DOI:
10.1016/s0002-9149(98)00637-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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