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Arch Virol. 1998;143(10):1985-92.

Poor induction of interferon-induced 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (2-5 AS) in cells persistently infected with mumps virus is caused by decrease of STAT-1 alpha.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Hokkaido, Japan.

Abstract

Poor induction of interferon-induced 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (2-5AS) has been demonstrated in cells persistently infected with mumps virus as compared with uninfected cells. As for the number of interferon (IFN) receptors and the level of IFN regulatory factors (IRF-1 and IRF-2) mRNAs, there was little difference between them. Therefore, it is suggested that the IFN-alpha signaling system is ineffective in the persistently infected cells. Components of IFN-stimulating gene factor 3 alpha (ISGF-3 alpha), STAT-1 alpha (p91) and STAT-2 (p113), were investigated in human amnion (FL), human nasopharyngeal cancer (KB), human T-lymphoid (HUT 78), and human B-lymphoid (Akata) cells persistently infected with mumps virus. STAT-1 alpha, but not STAT-2, disappeared in these persistently infected cells, and this factor was not restored by treatment of these cells with IFN. However, no difference was observed between the levels of STAT-1 alpha mRNA transcript in persistently infected and uninfected control cells. It is reasonable to infer that the poor induction of 2-5AS activity is due to the decrease of STAT-1 alpha in correlation with the IFN-signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, induction of other IFN-stimulated genes (ds-RNA activated protein kinase, PKR, and MxA protein) was also reduced in the cells persistently infected with mumps virus.

PMID:
9856085
DOI:
10.1007/s007050050434
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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