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Am J Public Health. 1998 Dec;88(12):1834-6.

Restaurant smoking restrictions and environmental tobacco smoke exposure.

Author information

1
University of British Columbia, Occupational Hygiene Program, Vancouver, Canada. brauer@unixg.ubc.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study evaluated the effectiveness of smoking restrictions.

METHODS:

We measured particulate concentrations in restaurants with different levels of allowable smoking.

RESULTS:

Mean particulate concentrations were 70% higher in establishments without smoking restrictions compared with those with partial smoking restrictions. Concentrations in nonsmoking restaurants were reduced by an additional 20% to 30%. Measurements of cadmium, an environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) marker, implicated ETS as the major source of particulate in restaurants that allowed smoking.

CONCLUSIONS:

Partial smoking restrictions substantially reduce, but do not eliminate, ETS exposure in restaurants. Occupants of nonsmoking restaurants avoid ETS exposure but may experience substantial particulate exposures from cooking emissions.

PMID:
9842382
PMCID:
PMC1509057
DOI:
10.2105/ajph.88.12.1834
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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