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Gastroenterology. 1998 Dec;115(6):1346-52.

Role of impaired gastric accommodation to a meal in functional dyspepsia.

Author information

1
Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital Gasthuisberg, University of Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Jan.Tack@med.kuleuven.ac.be

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Impaired accommodation of the proximal stomach to a meal has been reported in functional dyspepsia, but its relevance to symptoms is unclear. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that impaired gastric accommodation causes early satiety.

METHODS:

A gastric barostat was used to study postprandial fundus relaxation in 35 healthy subjects and 40 patients with functional dyspepsia. Gastric emptying, Helicobacter pylori status, sensitivity to gastric distention, and a dyspepsia symptom score were obtained from all patients. In addition, the effect of sumatriptan, a fundus-relaxing 5-hydroxytryptamine1 agonist, on gastric accommodation and on early satiety in dyspeptic patients was studied.

RESULTS:

Impaired gastric accommodation to a meal was found in 40% of the patients. In univariate analysis, this was associated with early satiety and weight loss but not with hypersensitivity to gastric distention, presence of H. pylori, or delayed gastric emptying. In a multivariate analysis, only early satiety was associated with impaired gastric accommodation. Sumatriptan restored gastric accommodation, thereby significantly improving meal-induced satiety.

CONCLUSIONS:

Impaired relaxation of the proximal stomach to a meal is present in a high proportion of patients with functional dyspepsia. It is associated with symptoms of early satiety. Restoring gastric accommodation with a fundus-relaxing drug improves early satiety.

Comment in

PMID:
9834261
DOI:
10.1016/s0016-5085(98)70012-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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