Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Microb Pathog. 1998 Oct;25(4):181-7.

Stimulation of pepsinogen release from chief cells by Helicobacter pylori: evidence for a role of calcium and calmodulin.

Author information

1
Department of General Pharmacology, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany.

Abstract

To define the mechanisms by which Helicobacter pylori stimulates pepsinogen secretion, the in vitro release of pepsinogen was studied using a preparation of pig chief cell monolayers. Helicobacter pylori induced a time- and concentration-dependent release of pepsinogen into the medium, with about a three-fold increase in pepsinogen secretion over controls found after 45 min of incubation. 3x10(7) H. pylori produced 50% of the maximal response found at a H. pylori count of 2x10(8). The action of H. pylori did not depend on the presence of the vacuolating toxin (vacA) and the cytotoxin-associated protein (cagA). Dibutyryl-cAMP and the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate also markedly stimulated pepsinogen secretion and enhanced the stimulatory effect of H. pylori. Helicobacter pylori-stimulated pepsinogen release was inhibited by lanthanum and the calmodulin antagonist W-7, but not by the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine, TMB-8, an agent that blocks the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores, the protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine and the protein kinase A inhibitor H-8. It is suggested that H. pylori directly stimulates pepsinogen release from gastric chief cells and that this effect is mediated via the calcium/calmodulin messenger branch.

PMID:
9817821
DOI:
10.1006/mpat.1998.0225
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center