Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1998 Nov;32(5):1454-9.

Increased left ventricular mass and hypertrophy are associated with increased risk for sudden death.

Author information

1
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Framingham Heart Study, Massachusetts 01702, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study examined the relations of echocardiographically determined left ventricular (LV) mass and hypertrophy to the risk of sudden death.

BACKGROUND:

Echocardiographic LV hypertrophy is associated with increased risk for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about the association of echocardiographic LV hypertrophy with sudden death.

METHODS:

We examined the relations of LV mass and hypertrophy to the incidence of sudden death in 3,661 subjects enrolled in the Framingham Heart Study who were > or =40 years of age. The baseline examination was performed from 1979 to 1983 and LV hypertrophy was defined as LV mass (adjusted for height) > 143 g/m in men and > 102 g/m in women. During up to 14 years of follow-up there were 60 sudden deaths. Cox models examined the relations of LV mass and LV hypertrophy to sudden death risk after adjusting for known risk factors.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of LV hypertrophy was 21.5%. The risk factor-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for sudden death was 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.10 to 1.92, p=0.008) for each 50-g/m increment in LV mass. For LV hypertrophy, the risk factor-adjusted HR for sudden death was 2.16 (95% CI 1.22 to 3.81, p=0.008). After excluding the first 4 years of follow-up, both increased LV mass and LV hypertrophy conferred long-term risk of sudden death (HR 1.53, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.28, p=0.047 and HR 3.28, 95% CI 1.58 to 6.83, p=0.002, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Increased LV mass and hypertrophy are associated with increased risk for sudden death after accounting for known risk factors.

Comment in

PMID:
9809962
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center