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Eur J Biochem. 1998 Oct 1;257(1):210-5.

Menaquinone-dependent succinate dehydrogenase of bacteria catalyzes reversed electron transport driven by the proton potential.

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1
Institut für Mikrobiologie und Weinforschung, Universität Mainz, Germany.

Abstract

Succinate dehydrogenases from bacteria and archaea using menaquinone (MK) as an electron acceptor (succinate/menaquinone oxidoreductases) contain, or are predicted to contain, two heme-B groups in the membrane-anchoring protein(s), located close to opposite sides of the membrane. All succinate/ubiquinone oxidoreductases, however, contain only one heme-B molecule. In Bacillus subtilis and other bacteria that use MK as the respiratory quinone, the succinate oxidase activity (succinate-->O2), and the succinate/menaquinone oxidoreductase activity were specifically inhibited by uncoupler (CCCP, carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone) or by agents dissipating the membrane potential (valinomycin). Other parts of the respiratory chains were not affected by the agents. Succinate oxidase or succinate/ubiquinone oxidoreductase from bacteria using ubiquinone as an acceptor were not inhibited. We propose that the endergonic electron transport from succinate (Eo' = +30 mV) to MK (Eo' approximately/= -80 mV) in succinate/menaquinone oxidoreductase includes a reversed electron transport across the cytoplasmic membrane from the inner (negative) to the outer (positive) side via the two heme-B groups. The reversed electron transport is driven by the proton or electrical potential, which provides the driving force for MK reduction.

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