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Plast Reconstr Surg. 1998 Oct;102(5):1479-85.

Treatment of axillary bromhidrosis with superficial liposuction.

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1
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taiwan.

Abstract

Axillary bromhidrosis or osmidrosis is a distressing problem that causes a serious personal and social handicap, especially in an Asian society. Surgical excision of the subcutaneous tissue, with or without skin excision in the axillary hair-bearing area, has been the treatment of choice for several decades. However, the complications of partial necrosis of wound edges or hematoma, and the possibility of the obvious unsightly scars, are always problems. We report our method of treatment of modified superficial liposuction with subdermal scraping under local anesthesia with tumescent infiltration. By using two tiny stab wounds, these two steps of liposuction can be done in the two-directional crisscross pattern. From August of 1995 to May of 1997, 20 patients (16 women and 4 men) received this surgery for bilateral axillas on an outpatient basis. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 27 months, and the mean follow-up period was 14 months. Eighteen patients (90 percent) had excellent to good results. Complication included only one minor wound infection that was cured easily. Two patients experienced transient subdermal fibrotic bands in one side of the axilla, and one patient experienced axillary skin with marked induration and retraction. All of these symptoms disappeared after 1 month or so. This minimal incision operation has the advantages of a high success rate, low complication rate, tiny to invisible scars, no change of hair distribution pattern, minimal postoperative care with a short term of compressive dressing (less than 2 days), and rapid recovery for daily activity and exercise.

PMID:
9774001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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