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J Comp Physiol B. 1998 Aug;168(6):419-26.

Short-day enhancement of immune function is independent of steroid hormones in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus).

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA. demas@ren.psy.jhu.edu

Abstract

The effects of photoperiod and steroid hormones on immune function were assessed in male and female deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus). In experiment 1, male deer mice were castrated, castrated and given testosterone replacement, or sham-operated. Half of each experimental group were subsequently housed in either long (LD 16:8) or short days (LD 8:16) for 10 weeks. Short-day deer mice underwent reproductive regression and displayed elevated lymphocyte proliferation in response to the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A, as compared to long-day mice. In experiment 2, female deer mice were ovariectomized, ovariectomized and given estrogen replacement, or sham-operated. Animals from each of these experimental groups were subsequently housed in either LD 16:8 or LD 8:16 for 10 weeks. Short-day deer mice underwent reproductive regression and displayed reduced serum estradiol concentrations and elevated lymphocyte proliferation in response to concanavalin A, as compared to long-day mice. Surgical manipulation had no effect on lymphocyte proliferation in either male or female deer mice. Neither photoperiod nor surgical manipulation affected serum corticosterone concentrations. These results confirm that both male and female deer mice housed in short days enhance immune function relative to long-day animals. Additionally, short-day elevation in splenocyte proliferation appears to be independent of the influence of steroid hormones in this species.

PMID:
9747522
DOI:
10.1007/s003600050161
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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