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Plant J. 1998 Jul;15(1):79-88.

Tetrad pollen formation in quartet mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana is associated with persistence of pectic polysaccharides of the pollen mother cell wall.

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1
Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Plant Biology, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

Abstract

The quartet (qrt) mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana produce tetrad pollen in which microspores fail to separate during pollen development. Because the amount of callose deposition between microspores is correlated with tetrad pollen formation in other species, and because pectin is implicated as playing a role in cell adhesion, these cell-wall components in wild-type and mutant anthers were visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy at different stages of microsporogenesis. In wild-type, callose was detected around the pollen mother cell at the onset of meiosis and around the microspores during the tetrad stage. Microspores were released into the anther locule at the stage where callose was no longer detected. Deposition and degradation of callose during tetrad pollen formation in qrt1 and qrt2 mutants were indistinguishable from those in wild-type. Enzymatic removal of callose from wild-type microspores at the tetrad stage did not release the microspores, suggesting that callose removal is not sufficient to disperse the microspores in wild-type. Pectic components were detected in the primary wall of the pollen mother cell. This wall surrounded the callosic wall around the pollen mother cell and the microspores during the tetrad stage. In wild-type, pectic components of this wall were no longer detectable at the time of microspore release. However, in qrt1 and qrt2 mutants, pectic components of this wall persisted after callose degradation. This result suggests that failure of pectin degradation in the pollen mother cell wall is associated with tetrad pollen formation in qrt mutants, and indicates that QRT1 and QRT2 may be required for cell type-specific pectin degradation to separate microspores.

PMID:
9744097
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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