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Clin Ther. 1998 Jul-Aug;20(4):744-59.

Clinical trial of ototopical ofloxacin for treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media.

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1
Professional Otolaryngology Associates, Voorhes, New Jersey 08043, USA.

Abstract

A multicenter, open-label prospective trial was performed to determine the clinical and microbiologic efficacy of ofloxacin (OFLX) otic solution in the treatment of subjects > or =12 years with chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) and a chronically perforated tympanic membrane in the infected ear(s). A total of 207 patients at 27 centers in the United States and Central America received OFLX 0.5 mL instilled ototopically twice daily for 14 consecutive days. The primary clinical end point was cure (dry ear) or failure (not dry ear). The primary microbiologic end point was eradication of baseline pathogens. Because there was no comparator and there were few data in the literature regarding clinical efficacy in patients treated with other regimens, the efficacy of OFLX was compared with data recorded in the clinical records of historical-practice control (HPC) or current-practice control (CPC) subjects. The incidence of clinical cure in clinically evaluable OFLX-treated patients (91%; 148 of 162 subjects) was significantly higher than in HPC subjects (67%; 124 of 185 subjects) or CPC subjects (70%; 38 of 54 subjects). OFLX eradicated all baseline pathogens isolated in microbiologically evaluable subjects. These pathogens were predominantly Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis. The most common treatment-related adverse event, bitter taste, occurred in 17% (35 of 207) of OFLX-treated subjects. Thus OFLX 0.5 mL administered twice daily for 14 days was effective in resolving the signs and symptoms of CSOM in subjects > or =12 years, was significantly more effective than therapies used to treat HPC or CPC subjects, and was well tolerated.

PMID:
9737834
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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