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J Nutr. 1998 Sep;128(9):1434-41.

Dietary soluble fiber lowers plasma LDL cholesterol concentrations by altering lipoprotein metabolism in female guinea pigs.

Author information

1
Lipid Metabolism Laboratory, Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.

Abstract

This experiment was designed to evaluate the effects of pectin (PE), guar gum (GG) and psyllium (PSY) intake on VLDL and LDL metabolism in female guinea pigs fed high dietary cholesterol. Guinea pigs were fed a 15 g/100 g fat diet containing 0.25 g/100 g cholesterol with 12.5 g/100 g PE, 12.5 g/100 g GG, 7.5 g/100 g PSY or 12.5 g/100 g cellulose (control diet) for 4 wk. Plasma cholesterol concentrations were 29, 43 and 39% lower in guinea pigs fed PE, GG or PSY, respectively, compared with the control group (P < 0.0001). Plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B concentrations were 16-22% lower in the groups fed soluble fiber compared with the control group (P < 0.01). In contrast, hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were not different among the PE, GG, PSY and control groups. No differences in triacylglycerol (TAG) or apo B secretion rates, measured by blocking VLDL catabolism by triton (WR 1339) injection, were observed, whereas plasma LDL apo B fractional catabolic rates (FCR), determined by injection of radiolabeled LDL, were higher in guinea pigs fed GG or PSY than in those from the control group. All sources of dietary soluble fiber reduced LDL apo B flux (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the mechanisms of plasma LDL cholesterol lowering by dietary soluble fiber are distinctive for each fiber source and result in specific alterations in lipoprotein metabolism in female guinea pigs. Differences between male and female guinea pigs in response to these diets are discussed.

PMID:
9732302
DOI:
10.1093/jn/128.9.1434
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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