Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Obes Surg. 1997 Dec;7(6):471-7.

Outcome of gastric restriction procedures: weight, psychiatric diagnoses, and satisfaction.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine, College of Medicine, Health Sciences Center, University of South Florida, Tampa 33613, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Weight losses following bariatric surgery have varied widely, depending on length of follow-up and various pre-surgical characteristics of patients undergoing surgery.

METHODS:

One hundred thirty one patients had a detailed presurgical psychiatric evaluation. Patients were assessed clinically for 2 years after surgery and at follow-up a mean of 5.7 years after surgery.

RESULTS:

Mean presurgical body mass index (BMI) was 52.9 kg/m2; therefore, many patients had 'super obesity'. Two-thirds of the patients were located a mean of 5.7 years after surgery. The mean change in BMI at follow-up was 25% and the mean weight loss was 27%. One-third had excellent or good weight outcomes using the Griffen criteria. Five patients had died by follow-up. There was no relationship between age, gender, or fat content presurgically and weight loss at follow-up, although presurgical weight was associated with greater weight loss at follow-up. Weight regain began 2 years after surgery. There was no relationship between the presence or absence of a presurgical psychiatric diagnosis and weight loss at follow-up. There was also no relationship between the presence of a presurgical psychiatric diagnosis and various mental health parameters at follow-up. Satisfaction with the surgery was marginally associated with weight loss but significantly associated with improved mental and physical health.

CONCLUSIONS:

Mean weight losses were less than have been previously reported with gastric restriction procedures but the follow-up was longer than usually reported and many patients had 'super obesity' prior to surgery. The implications of 'super obesity' for weight loss are discussed.

PMID:
9730503
DOI:
10.1381/096089297765555197
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center