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Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1998 Aug;17(8):711-6.

A statewide survey of immunization rates in Minnesota school age children: implications for targeted assessment and prevention strategies.

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1
Division of Disease Prevention and Control, Minnesota Department of Health, Minneapolis 55414, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A retrospective statewide immunization survey of the 69115 Minnesota children who entered kindergarten in 1992 was conducted.

METHODS:

Information was collected from school immunization records on date of birth, dates of vaccination for each dose of vaccine, address of residence and race/ethnicity (when available). Immunization rates were assessed retrospectively for each month of a child's life from 2 to 48 months of age. Age-appropriate immunization was defined as receipt of all scheduled vaccines within 30 days of the recommended age.

RESULTS:

Immunization levels varied by vaccine, age of the child and race/ethnicity. For example at 19 months of age, 73% of students had received measles, mumps, rubella vaccine; however, only 39% had received their fourth dose of diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis vaccine. White, non-Hispanic students consistently had higher vaccination rates than children of other racial/ ethnic groups. For example 45% of white, non-Hispanic students were age-appropriately vaccinated at 16 months of age compared with 25% of Blacks, 30% of American Indians, 30% of white Hispanics and 28% of Asian-Pacific Islanders (Mantel-Haenzel chi square, P < 0.001 for each comparison). Furthermore coverage rates frequently varied significantly by neighborhood, thereby identifying pockets of underimmunization within communities.

CONCLUSION:

Our data demonstrate that vaccination rates can vary substantially by age, race/ ethnicity and neighborhood. Detailed immunization assessment is necessary so that effective targeted interventions can be developed.

PMID:
9726346
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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