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Am J Physiol. 1998 Sep;275(3 Pt 1):G483-9.

Unique mechanism of inhibition of Na+-amino acid cotransport during chronic ileal inflammation.

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1
Division of Digestive Diseases, Departments of Medicine and Physiology, Ohio State University School of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA.

Abstract

In the chronically inflamed ileum, unique mechanisms of alteration of transport processes suggest regulation by different immune-inflammatory mediator pathways. We previously demonstrated that Na+-glucose cotransport in the chronically inflamed ileum was inhibited by a decrease in cotransporter number without a change in glucose affinity. The aim of this study was to determine the alterations in Na+-amino acid cotransport in chronically inflamed ileum produced by coccidial infection in rabbits. [3H]alanine uptake was performed in cells and vesicles by rapid filtration. In villus cells from chronically inflamed ileum, Na+-K+-ATPase was reduced 50% and Na+-alanine cotransport was also reduced (5.8 +/- 1.2 in normal and 1.4 +/- 0.5 nmol/mg protein in inflamed; n = 6, P < 0.05). [3H]alanine uptake in brush-border membrane vesicles was reduced in chronically inflamed ileum (73.2 +/- 1.2 in normal and 21.5 +/- 3.2 pmol/mg protein in inflamed; n = 3, P < 0.05), suggesting a direct effect on the cotransporter itself. Na+-amino acid cotransport in chronically inflamed ileum was inhibited by a decrease in affinity without a change in the maximal rate of uptake, and unaltered steady-state mRNA levels also suggested that the number of cotransporters was unchanged. Thus the mechanisms of inhibition of Na+-amino acid cotransport and Na+-glucose cotransport in chronically inflamed ileum are different. These observations suggest that different immune-inflammatory mediators may regulate different transport pathways during chronic ileitis.

PMID:
9724259
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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