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Gastroenterology. 1998 Sep;115(3):533-41.

Is colonoscopy needed for the nonadvanced adenoma found on sigmoidoscopy? The Polyp Prevention Trial.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

The need for colonoscopy when small tubular adenomas with low-grade dysplasia are found on sigmoidoscopy is uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and characteristics of proximal adenomas in patients with distal adenomas.

METHODS:

We studied 981 subjects with distal adenomas found on the index colonoscopy before randomization in the Polyp Prevention Trial.

RESULTS:

Four hundred sixty patients (46.9%) had >/=1 distal adenoma that was pathologically advanced (villous component, high-grade dysplasia, or >/=1 cm); 21.5% (211 of 981) had any proximal adenoma; and 4.3% (42 of 981) (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.0-5.5) had an advanced proximal adenoma. A greater percentage of patients with an advanced distal adenoma (5.9%) (95% CI, 3.7-8.0) had an advanced proximal adenoma compared with those with a nonadvanced distal adenoma (2.9%) (95% CI, 1.4-4.3) (OR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1-4.3; P = 0.03). Not performing a colonoscopy in patients with a nonadvanced distal adenoma would have missed 36% (15 of 42) of the advanced proximal adenomas.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with an advanced distal adenoma are twice as likely to have an advanced proximal adenoma as patients with a nonadvanced distal adenoma. However, eschewing a colonoscopy in patients with a nonadvanced distal adenoma would result in not detecting a sizeable percentage of the prevalent advanced proximal adenomas. These data support performance of a colonoscopy in patients with a nonadvanced distal adenoma. Confirmation of these results in asymptomatic subjects undergoing screening sigmoidoscopy is advisable.

PMID:
9721149
DOI:
10.1016/s0016-5085(98)70132-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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