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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 1998 Aug;79(8):925-30.

A 10-week strength training program: effect on the motor performance of an unimpaired upper extremity.

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1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Muscle strength training is one of the most common therapy methods in physical therapy programs, and the usual goal of this treatment is to improve muscle strength. Little attention has been paid, however, to the effects of strength training on the other components of motor performance. This study examined the effects of a 10-week strength training program on the motor performance of the hand, including reaction time, speed of movement, tapping speed, and coordination in normal healthy volunteers.

DESIGN:

Before-after trial.

SUBJECTS AND SETTING:

Sixteen healthy women volunteers aged 25 to 45 years participated.

INTERVENTION:

Subjects accomplished a 10-week muscle strength training program of the upper extremities.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Reaction time, speed of movement, tapping speed, and coordination were measured three times on consecutive days, and muscle strength and electromyographic values of the right upper extremity were recorded once before the training period. After the training period, the same measurements were made as before the training.

RESULTS:

The 10-week strength training decreased choice reaction time by 6% (p < .01) and increased tapping speed by 3% (p < .01) and coordination by 5% (p < .05). Speed of movement increased, but this change was not statistically significant. All the measured isometric muscle strengths and electromyographic activations upon maximum isometric contraction increased.

CONCLUSIONS:

A 10-week strength training of the upper extremities increased muscle strength and some motor performance functions of the hand, including choice reaction time, tapping speed, and coordination.

PMID:
9710164
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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