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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Aug;158(2):565-72.

Inflammatory cell distribution within and along asthmatic airways.

Author information

1
Pulmonary and Critical Care Division, Departments of Medicine and Departments of Surgery and Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA.

Abstract

Asthmatic airways are infiltrated with inflammatory cells that release mediators and cytokines into the microenvironment. In this study, we evaluated the distribution of CD45-positive leukocytes and eosinophils in lung tissue from five patients who died with severe asthma compared with five patients with cystic fibrosis. For morphometric analysis, the airway wall was partitioned into an "inner" area (between basement membrane and smooth muscle) and an "outer" area (between smooth muscle and alveolar attachments). Large airways (with a perimeter greater than 3.0 mm) from patients with asthma or cystic fibrosis had a greater density of CD45-positive cells (p < 0.05) and eosinophils (p < 0.001) in the inner airway region compared with the same airway region in small airways. Furthermore, in small airways, asthmatic lungs showed a greater density of CD45-positive cells (p < 0.01) and eosinophils (p < 0.01) in the outer compared with the inner airway wall region. These observations indicate that there are regional variations in inflammatory cell distribution within the airway wall in patients with asthma that are not observed in airways from patients with cystic fibrosis. We speculate that this inflammatory cell density in peripheral airways in severe asthma may relate to the peripheral airway obstruction characteristic of this condition.

PMID:
9700136
DOI:
10.1164/ajrccm.158.2.9705036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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