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Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1998 Jul;64(1):73-86.

Metabolism and action of urodilatin infusion in healthy volunteers.

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1
Research Laboratory of Nephrology and Hypertension, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The objective of this investigation was to study both the pharmacokinetics and renal pharmacodynamic properties of intravenously infused urodilatin in human beings.

METHODS:

Twelve healthy subjects received a short-term infusion (90 minutes) of urodilatin and placebo with a graded infusion rate (from 7.5 to 15 to 30 ng.kg body weight-1.min-1) in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study design. The renal parameters were evaluated by clearance technique with the use of 51Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, 125I-hippuran, and lithium. Urodilatin concentrations were determined by a radioimmunoassay with a urodilatin-specific antibody.

RESULTS:

Kinetics were characterized by a high apparent volume of distribution (43.7 +/- 11.2 L), a high total body clearance (5383 +/- 581 ml/min), and a short plasma half-life (5.57 +/- 0.8 minutes). The maximal plasma urodilatin level was 177.2 +/- 25.8 pmol/L. Less than 1% of total infused urodilatin was recovered in urine. Urodilatin significantly increased glomerular filtration rate (urodilatin, 7.0%, versus placebo, -1.9%; p < 0.05), reduced effective renal plasma flow (urodilatin, -17%, versus placebo, -3%; p < 0.01), increased fractional excretion of sodium (urodilatin, 137%, versus placebo, 27%; p < 0.05), and increased urine flow rate (urodilatin, 46%, versus placebo, -15%; p < 0.01). Fractional excretion of lithium did not change. Mean blood pressure decreased and vasoactive hormone levels remained unchanged or increased.

CONCLUSION:

The natriuretic and diuretic effects of urodilatin closely followed the profile of urodilatin concentration in plasma. A major part of the synthetic urodilatin was removed from circulation by a route other than filtration through the glomeruli.

PMID:
9695722
DOI:
10.1016/S0009-9236(98)90025-X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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