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Endoscopy. 1998 May;30(4):360-6.

Long-term efficacy of endoscopic stenting in patients with stricture of the biliary anastomosis after orthotopic liver transplantation.

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1
Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Niguarda Ca'Granda Hospital, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS:

The choledocho-choledochostomy (CCS) stricture is one of the most frequent complications occurring after liver transplantation. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) is the most sensitive method used to define the presence and narrowness of the stricture. Endoscopic stenting of the strictured anastomosis could provide an effective alternative to the surgical intervention.

PATIENTS AND METHOD:

ERCP was performed in 36 of 210 patients with liver transplantation and acute cholestasis or jaundice: in 15 cases biliary anastomotic stricture was found. These patients were endoscopically treated by long-term stenting of the common bile duct (CBD) (1 year) and followed up for more than 12 months after stent removal.

RESULTS:

In all cases the stenting procedure resolved the biliary obstruction syndrome within 7 days. At the end of the stenting period the CCS was dilated enough to allow adequate bile flow and absence of cholestasis. Moreover, in most patients (10) the anastomosis was kept patient for more than 1 year after stent removal, whereas only two patients had stricture recurrence and needed endoscopic restenting. Four patients dropped out of the study, respectively because of liver rejection (two), acute liver failure (one) and myocardial infarction (one). One patient who developed a stone of the transplanted CBD underwent surgical intervention.

CONCLUSIONS:

According to our data, the endoscopic stenting of the CBD might be considered as the first choice procedure in the setting of the biliary anastomotic strictures occurring after liver transplantation. It has proved to be safe and effective, avoiding the need for more invasive surgery, which in any case should be considered for nonresponsive patients.

PMID:
9689509
DOI:
10.1055/s-2007-1001283
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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