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Pharmacogenetics. 1998 Jun;8(3):211-25.

Non-monooxygenase cytochromes P450 as potential human autoantigens in anticonvulsant hypersensitivity reactions.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sleeder@cmh.edu

Abstract

Antibodies recognizing rat cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A1 but not the closely related human CYPs 3A4/5 have been identified in the sera of patients with hypersensitivity reactions to phenytoin and carbamazepine. Comparison of the mapped epitope to the comparable region in CYP3A4 revealed that Leu361 was essential for antibody recognition because of L361V mutation (mimicking human EYLDMVVNETLRL) abolished immunoreactivity. To identify alternative human autoantigens, a site-directed mutagenesis strategy was employed to identify amino acids critical for antibody recognition. A protein database search with the consensus sequence, DxVLxETLxx, from immunoblot analysis produced CYP8 (prostacyclin synthase), CYP5A1 (thromboxane synthase), CYP27 and CYP7A1 (cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase) as possible candidates; considerable homology was also observed with the fungal CYP52A subfamily. Immunoblotting with patient sera and fragments of each candidate autoantigen expressed as Escherichia coli gene 10 fusion proteins confirmed CYP8 and CYP5A1 as possible antigens, and revealed the presence of IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies against a construct mimicking fungal CYP52A10. All patient sera contained IgG4 antibodies against CYP8, CYP5A1 and the fungal mimic suggestive of continual antigenic challenge. In genetically susceptible individuals, prior infectious challenge may be a determinant of risk for the development of anticonvulsant hypersensitivity reactions and has been incorporated into a model investigating the pathogenesis of these events.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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