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Ann Surg. 1998 Jul;228(1):112-22.

Mechanisms of neutropenia involving myeloid maturation arrest in burn sepsis.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, Burn and Shock Trauma Institute, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois 60153, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the mechanisms that lead to the decrease in bone marrow production of neutrophils during burn sepsis.

SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA:

Impaired bone marrow granulopoiesis during burn sepsis often results in neutropenia despite elevated circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). To date, neither the specific stages of neutrophil maturation involved in the bone marrow suppression nor the mechanisms for the impairment have been determined.

METHODS:

Peripheral blood absolute neutrophil count and G-CSF levels were determined in mice 3 days after randomization to control, burn alone, or burn plus a topical inoculation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1000 colony-forming units). Bone marrow aspirates were analyzed for their neutrophil differentiation patterns by Gr-1 antigen expression and their G-CSF receptor status. Histologic analysis of liver, lung, spleen, and wound site was performed.

RESULTS:

In burn sepsis, absolute neutrophil count was reduced whereas plasma G-CSF levels were elevated, and myeloid differentiation was significantly shifted toward the immature mitotic myeloid cells. Bone marrow G-CSF receptor mRNA levels and G-CSF-stimulated proliferation were substantially decreased in burn sepsis. Histologic analysis revealed no significant neutrophil infiltration into the tissues.

CONCLUSIONS:

In thermal injury with superimposed sepsis, neutropenia and myeloid maturation arrest, despite the elevated levels of G-CSF, correlate with the reduction in bone marrow G-CSF receptor expression. These observations may provide a potential mechanism for neutropenia in sepsis.

PMID:
9671075
PMCID:
PMC1191436
DOI:
10.1097/00000658-199807000-00017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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