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Dermatology. 1998;196(4):401-7.

Influence of age, anatomic site and race on skin roughness and scaliness.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University of California at San Francisco, School of Medicine 94143-0989, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Variations in skin roughness and scaliness between age groups, anatomic sites and race have been assumed but minimally quantified.

OBJECTIVE:

We quantitatively investigated skin roughness, scaliness and stratum corneum hydration as a function of age, anatomic site and race (white and black).

METHODS:

Skin roughness, scaliness and stratum corneum hydration were determined in vivo by noninvasive bioengineering and image analysis techniques in 22 female subjects grouped according to age (young and aged) and race (white and black).

RESULTS:

Skin roughness, scaliness and stratum corneum hydration varied significantly in different anatomic areas and age groups. There was no racial variation in skin hydration between any anatomic site, nor significant differences in roughness and scaliness between races, except for the preauricular area. Skin roughness was significantly increased in the aged, compared to the young at the preauricle, volar forearm, lower back, thigh and lower leg. Older women demonstrated significantly more scaling at the preauricle than younger women. Stratum corneum hydration correlated with scaliness. No significant correlation between stratum corneum hydration and skin roughness was observed.

CONCLUSION:

Age and anatomic site but not race demonstrated a significant influence on skin roughness and scaliness. The desquamation index appears a good indicator of the status of stratum corneum hydration.

PMID:
9669115
DOI:
10.1159/000017932
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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