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Am J Vet Res. 1998 Jul;59(7):898-903.

Effects of concentrated electrolytes administered via a paste on fluid, electrolyte, and acid base balance in horses.

Author information

1
Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To test effectiveness of an electrolyte paste in correcting fluid, electrolyte and acid base alterations in response to furosemide administration.

ANIMALS:

6 Standardbreds.

PROCEDURES:

Horses received electrolyte paste or water only (control). The paste was given orally 3 hours after furosemide administration (1 mg/kg of body weight, IM). Water was given ad libitum soon after the paste and 3 hours after furosemide administration to treated and control groups, respectively. Paste Na+, K+, and Cl- composition was approximately 2,220, 620, and 2,840 mmol, respectively. The PCV and plasma concentrations of total protein ([TP]), [Na+], [K+], [Cl-]), and bicarbonate ([HCO3-]) were determined, and urinary fluid and electrolyte excretion, fecal water, and body weight changes were measured.

RESULTS:

At the end of a 6-hour period, the paste-treated group had higher water consumption, which resulted in lower plasma [TP]; net electrolyte losses also were substantially less. With paste administration, [Na+] was approximately 2 mmol/L above a prefurosemide value of 137.3 mmol/L; control horses had values similar to the prefurosemide value. Plasma [Cl-] remained at the prefurosemide value, but values in control horses decreased by 7 mmol/L with water consumption. Plasma [K+] remained approximately 0.8 mmol/L below prefurosemide values in both groups. Venous [HCO3-] returned to prefurosemide values after paste administration, but alkalosis persisted in control horses after consumption of water only. Body weight loss was less after paste administration.

CONCLUSIONS:

Administration of electrolyte paste is advantageous over water alone in restoring fluid, electrolyte, and acid base balance after fluid and electrolyte loss attributable to furosemide administration.

PMID:
9659559
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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