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Lancet. 1997 Oct 25;350(9086):1205-9.

Randomised placebo-controlled trial of rhesus-human reassortant rotavirus vaccine for prevention of severe rotavirus gastroenteritis.

Author information

1
University of Tampere, Medical School, Finland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Rotavirus is the most common cause of acute childhood gastroenteritis. Vaccination with live oral heterologous rotavirus vaccines may prevent rotavirus gastroenteritis. We assessed the efficacy of rhesus-human reassortant rotavirus tetravalent vaccine (RRV-TV) against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in Finnish children in a randomised placebo-controlled double-blind trial.

METHODS:

Placebo or RRV-TV (titre 4x10(5) plaque-forming units) was given to infants at ages 2, 3, and 5 months. The children were followed up for one or two rotavirus epidemic seasons. The main outcome measure was protection against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis (score > or =11 on a 20-point severity scale). 2398 children were enrolled and received at least one dose of RRV-TV (n=1191) or placebo (n=1207). The primary efficacy analysis was based on children who received three doses of RRV-TV (n=1128) or placebo (n=1145).

FINDINGS:

256 episodes of rotavirus gastroenteritis occurred at any time during the study; 65 were among 1191 RRV-TV recipients, and 191 among 1207 placebo recipients (vaccine efficacy 66% [95% CI 55-74]; intention-to-treat analysis). 226 episodes were included in the primary efficacy analysis of fully vaccinated children (54 among 1128 RRV-TV recipients, 172 among 1145 placebo recipients; vaccine efficacy 68% [57-76]). 100 episodes were severe, eight in RRV-TV recipients and 92 in placebo recipients (vaccine efficacy 91% [82-96]).

INTERPRETATION:

RRV-TV vaccine was highly effective against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis in young children. Incorporation of this vaccine into routine immunisation schedules of infants could reduce severe rotavirus gastroenteritis by 90% and severe gastroenteritis of all causes in young children by 60%.

PMID:
9652561
DOI:
10.1016/S0140-6736(97)05118-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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