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Pediatr Neurol. 1998 May;18(5):415-9.

Liposteroid (dexamethasone palmitate) therapy for West syndrome: a comparative study with ACTH therapy.

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1
Department of Pediatrics, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Miyamae, Kawasaki, Japan.

Abstract

Dexamethasone palmitate (liposteroid) was used for the treatment of West syndrome and compared with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy. A single intravenous injection of liposteroid (0.25 mg/kg) was administered seven times in 3 months (total dosage = 1.75 mg/kg) to five symptomatic patients with West syndrome, aged 4-11 months. ACTH (0.025 mg/kg/day) was administered intramuscularly for 6 weeks according to the conventional therapy in Japan (total dosage = 0.625 mg/kg) to five symptomatic patients with West syndrome, aged 6-10 months. Nodding spasm and hypsarrhythmia on EEG disappeared in all patients in the liposteroid therapy group within four doses; however, partial seizures and focal spikes on EEG reappeared in three patients 2 months after the end of liposteroid therapy. In the ACTH therapy group, nodding spasm and hypsarrhythmia on EEG similarly disappeared during treatment in all patients, but nodding spasm reappeared 2 months after therapy in two patients and partial seizures reappeared in one patient 3 months after therapy. No notable adverse reactions occurred in the liposteroid group, but transient dysfunction of the thyroid and anterior pituitary gland and increased levels of serum cortisol were experienced in the ACTH group. These results suggest that glucocorticoid incorporated in a lipid emulsion is useful for the treatment of West syndrome.

PMID:
9650682
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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