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Am J Gastroenterol. 1998 Jun;93(6):976-9.

Thyroid and celiac disease: clinical, serological, and echographic study.

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1
Department of Endocrinology, Institute of Internal Medicine, University of Cagliari, Italy.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We sought to reevaluate the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and thyroid autoimmunity in 47 patients with celiac disease; 91 healthy subjects were studied as controls. Both patients and controls were from Sardinia, Italy.

METHODS:

Diagnosis of celiac disease was made on the basis of clinical history, presence of positive antigliadin IgA (AGA-A) and IgG (AGA-G) antibodies, antireticulin antibodies (ARA), antiendomysium antibodies (EMA), and was confirmed by jejunal biopsy. HLA class II typing for DQB1 and DQA1 alleles was performed in 36/47 celiac patients. Thyroid was evaluated by palpation and echography; serum free thyroid hormones (FT4, FT3), thyrotropic hormone (TSH), and antithyroid peroxidase autoantibodies (anti-TPO) were assayed by radioimmunoassays.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of anti-TPO was higher in celiac patients (29.7%) than in healthy controls (9.6%) (p < 0.001) and thyroid echography frequently displayed (42.5%) a hypoechogenic pattern. Five anti-TPO-positive celiac patients were hypothyroid (two overt, three subclinical). A higher but not significantly different prevalence of anti-TPO (3/7 = 42.8%) was found in celiac patients displaying the DQB1*0502 genotype, when compared with the remaining patients (8/29 = 27.6%).

CONCLUSIONS:

An elevated prevalence of clinical and subclinical autoimmune thyroid autoimmunity was found in Sardinian celiac patients, especially in those displaying the DQB1*0502 genotype; this finding could be related to a particular genetic background of the Sardinian population.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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