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Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1998 May;63(5):571-9.

Effects of tobacco smoking and abstinence on middle latency auditory evoked potentials.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109-0632, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the effects of tobacco cigarette smoking and overnight abstinence on middle latency auditory evoked potentials among smokers and nonsmokers.

METHODS:

Groups of 9 to 10 adult male and female nonsmokers and smokers participated in the study. Each person volunteered for two laboratory sessions conducted in the early afternoon on 2 separate days. Smokers abstained from tobacco products 6 to 15 hours before the abstinent session and maintained their usual smoking behavior before the smoking session. The nonsmokers had a similar laboratory experience but sham smoked by means of inhaling air. Middle latency auditory evoked potentials were recorded from Cz to both ears as reference.

RESULT:

The latencies of the Na and Pa potentials during the smoking session were significantly (p < 0.01) shorter than those in abstinent smokers and nonsmokers. After smoking, peak-to-trough amplitudes for the V-Na, Na-Pa, and Pa-Nb potentials were larger than those after abstinence and significantly larger than those among nonsmokers.

CONCLUSIONS:

The shorter latencies of the middle latency brain wave components in the smoking session suggest faster processing of sensory information after cigarette smoking. Larger Pa amplitudes after cigarette smoking suggest a higher arousal level than that among partially abstinent smokers and nonsmokers.

PMID:
9630830
DOI:
10.1016/S0009-9236(98)90108-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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