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J Am Coll Cardiol. 1998 Jun;31(7):1635-40.

Influence of left ventricular geometric patterns on prognosis in patients with or without coronary artery disease.

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1
Department of Medicine, Louisiana State University Medical School, Shreveport 71130-3932, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We sought to examine patterns of left ventricular (LV) geometry as determined by echocardiography and their association with mortality in patients with or without coronary artery disease (CAD).

BACKGROUND:

The independent prognostic role of LV geometry remains uncertain.

METHODS:

We performed a cohort study based on 988 consecutive patients who underwent both coronary arteriography for presumed CAD and echocardiography and were followed up for a mean of 9 years (range 5 to 13). Patients were classified into four LV geometry patterns: normal, concentric remodeling, eccentric LV hypertrophy (LVH) and concentric LVH.

RESULTS:

Patients with concentric LVH consistently showed the largest increase in LV posterior wall and septal thickness and LV mass index, as well as relative wall thickness (RWT), regardless of status of the coronary arteries. This pattern conferred the highest risk of both all-cause and cardiac mortality. Eccentric LVH moderately increased the risk of death compared with normal geometry; no substantial increase in mortality was noted in patients with concentric remodeling. When LV index and RWT were analyzed as continuous measures and considered in the same Cox proportional hazards model, increases in LV mass were independently associated with risk, but this outcome was less clear for RWT.

CONCLUSIONS:

In this series of patients referred to coronary angiography for suspected CAD, LVH conferred most of the predictive information from echocardiography. Patients with both LVH and abnormal RWT--concentric LVH--represent a group with the greatest mortality risk. Concentric remodeling may not be associated with increased risk of death because the predictive value of RWT is not as strong as for LV mass.

PMID:
9626845
DOI:
10.1016/s0735-1097(98)00131-4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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