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Jpn J Cancer Res. 1998 Apr;89(4):355-60.

The relationship between population density and cancer mortality in Taiwan.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, Kaohsiung Medical College, Taiwan.

Abstract

Many investigators have examined urbanization gradients in cancer rates. The purpose of this report was to identify urban-rural trends in cancer mortality rates (1982-1991) for municipalities in Taiwan. For this purpose, Taiwan's municipalities were classified as rural, suburban, urban, or metropolitan, using population density as an ordinal indicator of the degree of urbanization. Average annual age-adjusted, site-specific cancer mortality rates were calculated for both sexes within each population density group. Significant increasing trends with more urbanization were observed in mortality rates for cancers of the lung, pancreas, and kidney among both males and females, as well as male prostate cancer, and female breast and ovary cancer. In addition, this study revealed a significant rural excess for nonmelanoma skin cancer among both males and females, as well as male non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and cancers of the female bone, and female connective tissue. Analytic studies for sites with consistent urban-rural trends may be fruitful in identifying the aspect of population density, or other unmeasured factors, that contribute to these trends.

PIP:

Almost all studies which have reported variation in cancer incidence and mortality rates across urbanization gradients have found higher rates in urban populations than in rural areas. Findings are presented from a study conducted to identify urban-rural trends in cancer mortality rates during 1982-91 for municipalities in Taiwan. The countries municipalities were classified as rural, suburban, urban, or metropolitan, using population density as an ordinal indicator of the degree of urbanization. Average annual age-adjusted, site-specific cancer mortality rates were calculated for both sexes within each population density group. Significant increasing trends with more urbanization were observed in mortality rates for cancers of the lung, pancreas, and kidney among both men and women, as well as male prostate cancer and female breast and ovary cancer. The study also found a significant rural excess for non-melanoma skin cancer among men and women, as well as male non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and cancers of the female bone and connective tissue.

PMID:
9617339
PMCID:
PMC5921820
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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