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Neuroscience. 1998 Jul;85(1):149-78.

GABAergic and cholinergic basal forebrain and preoptic-anterior hypothalamic projections to the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus in the cat.

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1
Institute of Human Physiology II, University of Milano, Italy.

Abstract

The present study examined projections of GABAergic and cholinergic neurons from the basal forebrain and preoptic-anterior hypothalamus to the "intermediate" part of the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus. Retrograde transport from this region of the mediodorsal nucleus was investigated using horseradish peroxidase-conjugated wheatgerm agglutinin in combination with peroxidase-antiperoxidase immunohistochemical staining for glutamic acid decarboxylase and choline acetyltransferase. A relatively large number of retrogradely-labelled glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive neurons are located in the basal forebrain, amounting to more than 7% of the total population of glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive cells in this region. Moreover, retrogradely-labelled choline acetyltransferase-positive cells are interspersed among glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive neurons, accounting for about 6% of the total choline acetyltransferase-positive cell population in the basal forebrain. The glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive and choline acetyltransferase-positive retrogradely-labelled neurons are distributed throughout several regions of the basal forebrain, including the medial septum, the diagonal band of Broca, the magnocellular preoptic nucleus, the substantia innominata pars anterior, the substantia innominata pars posterior, and the globus pallidus where only a few retrogradely-labelled neurons were seen. The choline acetyltransferase-positive mediodorsal-projecting neurons are morphologically different from the choline acetyltransferase-positive neurons in the basal forebrain, suggesting that those projecting to the mediodorsal nucleus are a small proportion of the cholinergic neuronal population in the basal forebrain. In the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus, many retrogradely-labelled glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive cells were found, amounting to more than 7% of the total population of glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive cells in this region. These retrogradely-labelled glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive neurons are distributed throughout the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus in a continuous line with those in the basal forebrain, including the lateral preoptic area, the medial preoptic area, the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the anterior and dorsal hypothalamic areas. The highest percentage of mediodorsal-projecting GABAergic neurons is in the anterior lateral hypothalamus where more than 25% of the total population of glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive cells project to the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus. Overall, of the large population of retrogradely-labelled neurons in the basal forebrain and preoptic-anterior hypothalamus, a significant proportion are glutamic acid decarboxylase-positive neurons (> 60% in the basal forebrain and > 30% in the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus), while the choline acetyltransferase-positive neurons amount to a smaller percentage of the neurons projecting to the mediodorsal nucleus (< 13% in the basal forebrain and < 2% in the preoptic-anterior hypothalamus). These results provide anatomical evidence of direct GABAergic projections from the basal forebrain and preoptic-anterior hypothalamic regions to the "intermediate" part of the mediodorsal nucleus in the cat. This GABAergic projection field could be the direct pathway by which the basal forebrain directly modulates thalamic excitability and may also be involved in mechanisms modulating electroencephalographic synchronization and sleep through the "intermediate" mediodorsal nucleus.

PMID:
9607710
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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