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JAMA. 1998 May 20;279(19):1554-9.

Comparison of molecular changes in lung cancers in HIV-positive and HIV-indeterminate subjects.

Author information

1
Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas 75235-8593, USA.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been associated with an increasing incidence of malignancy, and HIV-infected persons have an increased incidence of primary lung carcinoma compared with the general population.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the molecular changes present in HIV-associated lung tumors and compare them with those present in lung carcinomas arising in HIV-indeterminate subjects ("sporadic tumors").

DESIGN:

Convenience sample.

SUBJECTS:

Archival tissues from 11 HIV-positive persons and from 35 persons of indeterminate HIV status.

SETTING:

University-based medical centers and affiliated hospitals.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Analysis of frequency of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite alteration (MA) using polymerase chain reaction and 16 polymorphic microsatellite markers at 8 chromosomal regions frequently deleted in lung cancer. Presence of HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences.

RESULTS:

The overall frequency of LOH at all chromosomal regions tested and the frequencies at most of the individual regions were similar in the 2 groups. Frequency of MA present in the HIV-associated tumors (0.18) was 6-fold higher than in sporadic tumors (0.03) (P<.001). At least 1 MA was present in 10 (91%) of 11 HIV-associated tumors vs 17 (48%) of 35 sporadic tumors (P=.02). Molecular changes were independent of tumor stage and gender. HIV and HPV sequences were not detected in the HIV-associated lung carcinomas.

CONCLUSIONS:

Microsatellite alterations, which reflect widespread genomic instability, occur at greatly increased frequency in HIV-associated lung carcinomas. Although the mechanism underlying the development of increased MAs is unknown, it may play a crucial role in the development of many HIV-associated tumors.

PMID:
9605900
DOI:
10.1001/jama.279.19.1554
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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