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Am J Public Health. 1998 Jan;88(1):45-50.

An evaluation of Safe Dates, an adolescent dating violence prevention program.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study assessed the effects of the Safe Dates program on the primary and secondary prevention of adolescent dating violence.

METHODS:

Fourteen schools were randomly allocated to treatment conditions. Eighty percent (n=1886) of the eighth and ninth graders in a rural county completed baseline questionnaires, and 1700 (90%) completed follow-up questionnaires.

RESULTS:

Treatment and control groups were comparable at baseline. In the full sample at follow-up, less psychological abuse, sexual violence, and violence perpetrated against the current dating partner were reported in treatment than in control schools. In a subsample of adolescents reporting no dating violence at baseline (a primary prevention subsample), there was less initiation of psychological abuse in treatment than in control schools. In a subsample of adolescents reporting dating violence at baseline (a secondary prevention subsample), there was less psychological abuse and sexual violence perpetration reported at follow-up in treatment than in control schools. Most program effects were explained by changes in dating violence norms, gender stereotyping, and awareness of services.

CONCLUSIONS:

The Safe Dates program shows promise for preventing dating violence among adolescents.

PMID:
9584032
PMCID:
PMC1508378
DOI:
10.2105/ajph.88.1.45
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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