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J Am Assoc Gynecol Laparosc. 1998 May;5(2):141-8.

In vivo detection of metastatic ovarian cancer by means of 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced fluorescence in a rat model.

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1
Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California Irvine 92612, USA.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

To determine the feasibility of macroscopic visualization of small ovarian cancer metastases in vivo by fluorescence after intravenous administration of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA); to assess the time after drug injection when fluorescence of small metastases is maximum; and to correlate macroscopic in vivo fluorescence with both microscopic ex vivo fluorescence and histologic findings.

DESIGN:

Controlled animal study (Canadian Task Force classification I).

SETTING:

University-based facility.

SUBJECTS:

Twenty-four healthy, female Fischer rats.

INTERVENTION:

Diffuse peritoneal metastatic cancer was induced in Fischer 344 rats by intraperitoneal injection of 1 million syngeneic ovarian cancer cells (NuTu-19). Four weeks after induction ALA100 mg/kg was injected intravenously, and diagnostic laparotomy was performed 1, 3, 6, or 9 hours thereafter.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

The peritoneal cavity was illuminated with the Wood's lamp (ultraviolet light). Fluorescence was determined by direct visualization and compared with a calibrated fluorescent disk. Tissues were collected, sectioned, and examined by fluorescence and conventional light microscopy. Within 1 to 3 hours after intravenous injection of ALA, in vivo fluorescence of tumor nodules (diameter 0.4-5.0 mm) was macroscopically visible. Tumor-free peritoneum did not show fluorescence and was significantly distinguishable from cancer nodules. Fluorescence from intestinal tissues was comparable with tumor nodules. Microscopic fluorescence analysis showed similar values for tumor nodules and peritoneum. Stained histologic specimens of peritoneal surface revealed a superficial layer of cancer cells responsible for fluorescence. The time course of the fluorescence curve in the intestine peaked twice, at 1 and 6 hours after ALA injection. Macroscopically fluorescing nodules were histology confirmed as malignant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Fluorescence detection of small cancer nodules after intravenous injection of ALA is feasible for nodules smaller than 0.5 mm on the peritoneum. One to 3 hours after drug injection is optimal for diagnosis of metastases.

PMID:
9564061
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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