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Seizure. 1998 Feb;7(1):49-54.

Epilepsy, cerebral calcifications and clinical or subclinical coeliac disease. Course and follow up with gluten-free diet.

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1
Neurology Department, Nuestra Señora de la Candelaria Hospital, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain. mangel@iic.vanaga.es

Abstract

We have studied four patients (three male, one female, age range 15-25 years) with epilepsy, bilateral occipital calcifications and latent coeliac disease (CD). The epilepsy started at mean age 7 years, in three cases there were partial seizures and in one case generalized seizure. Three cases had symptoms suggesting malabsorptive syndrome during infancy and one case was diagnosed CD before the onset of seizures. In all cases serologic markers of CD were found, especially antiendomisium antibody, and intestinal biopsy indicated several grades of atrophy. The electroencephalograph (EEG) findings pointed to focal abnormalities in three patients and generalized abnormalities in one patient. In all cases computer tomography (CT) showed bilateral, almost symmetrical occipital calcifications in the cortical subcortical layers. The enhanced CT were unremarkable and magnetic resonance images (MRI) were normal. After diagnosis of CD, all patients followed a gluten-free diet and in three patients a significant reduction in seizure frequency was observed. CD should be ruled out in all cases of epilepsy, cerebral calcifications of unexplained origin and malabsorption syndrome in infancy.

PMID:
9548226
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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