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Pediatr Res. 1998 Apr;43(4 Pt 1):435-41.

Epithelial tight junction structure in the jejunum of children with acute and treated celiac sprue.

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1
Department of Gastroenterology, Universitätsklinikum Benjamin Franklin, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

Tight junction morphology was analyzed in freeze fracture electron micrographs from biopsies at two locations along the surface-crypt axis in the jejunum of children with treated and untreated sprue and in control subjects. In control jejunum, strand number, meshwork depth, and total depth of the tight junction decreased from surface to crypt, consistent with the concept of the crypt being more permeable than the surface epithelium. In acute sprue, strand number was reduced in all regions along the surface-crypt axis, from 5.5+/-0.2 to 3.4+/-0.3 (surface) and from 4.7+/-0.2 to 3.6+/-0.1 (crypt). Meshwork depth was also reduced at all regions along the surface-crypt axis. Strand discontinuities were more frequent in acute sprue. Aberrant strands appeared below the main meshwork of crypt tight junctions in acute sprue. In asymptomatic children treated with the gluten-free diet, jejunal tight junctional structure only partially recovered. Strand number was restored to normal at the surface, but was still decreased in the crypts, from 4.7+/-0.2 to 3.9+/-0.3. We conclude that the epithelial barrier function of the small intestine is seriously disturbed by structural modifications of the tight junction in acute symptomatic celiac disease, thereby accounting for increased ionic permeability noted in a parallel study on identical specimens. This epithelial barrier defect may contribute to diarrhea in celiac disease by a "leak flux mechanism." In children with sprue treated with a gluten-free diet, barrier dysfunction was only partly recovered, suggesting a level of "minimal damage."

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