Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Affect Disord. 1998 Mar;48(2-3):181-90.

Subpopulations of early separation anxiety: relevance to risk of adult anxiety disorders.

Author information

1
Psychiatry Research and Teaching Unit, South Western Sydney Area Health Service, Liverpool, NSW, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The present study aims to examine whether discrete subpopulations can be identified according to their levels of early separation anxiety (SA), and if so, whether such a typology of SA influences risk to particular adult anxiety disorders.

METHODS:

Mixture analysis was applied to early SA scores provided retrospectively by a composite group (n=1800) of adult community and patient samples. The distribution of adult anxiety diagnoses across the SA categories was assessed in a community (n=136) and a clinic (n=74) sample.

RESULTS:

The mixture analysis yielded two subpopulations according to SA scores. Odds ratios for assignment to the high SA category for the various anxiety disorders ranged from 3.6 to 6.7. A logistic regression analysis revealed that when comorbidity was taken into account, the panic disorder-agoraphobia (PD-Ag) group was the only anxiety disorder to be associated with the high SA category.

CONCLUSION:

Assignment to a high early SA category appears to increase risk to adult anxiety disorders, particularly PD-Ag. Several possible pathways may account for such a risk including the persistence of separation anxiety disorder into adulthood.

LIMITATIONS:

Assessment of early SA was made using a retrospective measure and the samples included groups which were known to have high SA scores.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Only a subpopulation of anxiety sufferers may have elevated levels of SA. Identification of this group may be important for early detection and intervention.

PMID:
9543208
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center