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EMBO J. 1998 Apr 1;17(7):2055-66.

Hus1p, a conserved fission yeast checkpoint protein, interacts with Rad1p and is phosphorylated in response to DNA damage.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Warren Alpert Building, 200 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. kostrub@rascal.med.harvard.edu

Abstract

The hus1+ gene is one of six fission yeast genes, termed the checkpoint rad genes, which are essential for both the S-M and DNA damage checkpoints. Classical genetics suggests that these genes are required for activation of the PI-3 kinase-related (PIK-R) protein, Rad3p. Using a dominant negative allele of hus1+, we have demonstrated a genetic interaction between hus1+ and another checkpoint rad gene, rad1+. Hus1p and Rad1p form a stable complex in wild-type fission yeast, and the formation of this complex is dependent on a third checkpoint rad gene, rad9+, suggesting that these three proteins may exist in a discrete complex in the absence of checkpoint activation. Hus1p is phosphorylated in response to DNA damage, and this requires rad3+ and each of the other checkpoint rad genes. Although there is no gene related to hus1+ in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, we have identified closely related mouse and human genes, suggesting that aspects of the checkpoint control mechanism are conserved between fission yeast and higher eukaryotes.

PMID:
9524127
PMCID:
PMC1170550
DOI:
10.1093/emboj/17.7.2055
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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